Reptiles Alive! at Lamond-Riggs Library in NE DC

reptile show - kids entertainment - animal show

The Summer is heating up and it is time for another Repitles Alive show as part of the D.C. Public Library Summer Reading Series.  Ssssslither on over to the Lamond-Riggs Neighborhood Library in NE DC for a FREE live animal show feature 6 exotic animals from all across the world.  You will meet snakes, lizards, a frog or toad, a baby alligator, and a big boa constrictor.  Make sure to ssssstick around to ask questions and check out a book on one of the animals you met during the show.  Check out our Kids Page before the show for great reptile themed activities.

Creature Feature: Boa Constrictor

Boa Constrictor

Boa constrictor

Reptiles Alive Name: “Dennis & Sunflower (the albino)”

Hisssstory: Dennis was an unwanted pet left with reptile rescue organization that adopted him to us in October of 2003.   Sunflower came from a special boa constrictor breeding facility in April of 2009.

RA Diet: Frozen, defrosted and then warmed up jumbo sized dead rats.  Yummmmmmmmmmm.boa_constrictor

Range: Boa constrictors have an enormous range from Mexico to Argentina.

Habitat:
 Boa constrictors  live in many habitats:  rain forests, dry tropical woodlands, grasslands, farms, and even urban regions.

Natural Diet: Boa constrictors will consume birds,  small mammals, and occasionally reptiles.

Size: The boa constrictor grows to an average length of 9 feet. Record length was 13 feet 1 inch. (The biggest snake, the anaconda, is a type of boa.)

Reproduction: Females give live birth of up to 50 babies at a time.

Lifespan:
 Boa constrictors are  long living snakes and can live for 40 years.

Conservation:
 Threats include:  human predation, roads, habitat loss and the pet trade. This is one of  the most commonly abandoned pet snakes.   Boa constrictors  get large, requiring custom built reptile enclosures, high heat and humidity, and food is not often found at the local grocery store!  Not a good pet choice for most people.

Cool Facts: 
Boa constrictors are the kings and queens of the jungle.  Most rain forest animals are adapted to live in a specific layer of the forest.  For example:  Amazon river turtles live in the river, giant toads live on the forest floor,  and iguanas live in the canopy.  Boa constrictors, however, are adapted for living in all the layers of the jungle.  Like all snakes, they swim, so you can find them in the river.  Their beautiful colors give them camouflage that makes them almost invisible while resting quietly on the forest floor.  And, boa constrictors love to hang out in the canopy!  The boa constrictor is the master of the rain forest.

Name that Boa Contest

We have some new scaley faces here at Reptiles Alive this summer.  The new arrivals will be in quarantine for a few months while we double check that they are healthy and ready to go to shows with us.

Our first new arrival is a baby albino boa constrictor we received from a reptile facility in Tennessee.  She is healthy, gorgeous and we named her Sunflower.  Sunflower is only about 15 inches long right now and weighs less than a pound.  She will grow to over 6 feet long and could weigh over 50 pounds.  She is an up and coming star.  You may begin to see her next fall.

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Sunflower the albino boa constrictor

Our next arrival is a 14 pound, 6 feet long albino burmese python – the same kind of snake as Sunshine.  We have decided to name this new python “Moonlight.”  Moonlight was rescued from a pet store that was not taking care of its animals.  The python is relatively healthy, despite the neglect, but it does have snake mites.  Snake mites are not contagious to humans, but they can spread to many different species of reptiles.  As soon as I received Moonlight, I soaked him for about 2 hours and picked off all the mites I found.  After his bath, Moonlight then recieved an massage in canola oil.  He is doing great and his skin will be oh so soft.

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Moonlight, the albino Burmese python

The third new arrival is a “normal” colored boa constrictor that was an unwanted pet.  This snake is very pretty and he seems healthy as well.  But, he needs a name.

We know for sure he is a he (he was breeding with a cage mate before we received him.)  Boa constrictors come from Mexico, Central and South America.  So, we are looking for show name that would be good for him.  If you can think of a good show name for our new boa – please let us know.  If we like your  idea, we will use the name you chose.

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Name this boa constrictor