One of the most isolated areas of the lower 48 United States is the only place where four states intersect at one point:  Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, and Utah.

four-corners-symbol-300x225Four Corners Monument is located on Navajo Nation Land and is operated by the Navajo Parks & Recreation Department.  The Navajo are in the process of renovating the area – they have added a granite and brass marker, interpretive signs, and booths for Navajo vendors selling handmade jewelry, crafts and traditional foods.

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After spending some time walking around in the four states, we got back in the Monte Carlo and headed south into Arizona towards our next stop:  Canyon de Chelly National Monument.

canyon-de-chelly-panorama-300x84Canyon de Chelly National Monument is managed by the United States National Park Service, however, the entire 84,000 acre  Monument is comprised of  Navajo Tribal Trust Land.

The area is one of the longest continuously inhabited regions in North America.  Ancient Puebloans (Anasazi) built cities into the cliffs and overhangs throughout the canyon.  They left the area in the mid 1300′s.

The Navajo re-settled the area and about 40 families currently reside in the Monument’s boundaries.

While we were at an overlook, I saw a group of children playing basketball in field at the bottom of the canyon.  Right next to where the children were having so much fun were the ruins of an Ancient Puebloan city.

cliff-dwellings-at-canyondechelly-300x225While we were at another overlook, my Dad decided to be funny and moo at some cows he saw on the canyon floor.  Dad’s voice seemed to echo and echo throughout the canyon.  In fact, it just kept echoing.  “Wow, that is a REALLY LONG echo in this canyon!” I exclaimed.  Until my brother pointed to a rancher walking down the dirt road far below us.  He was mooing back at us.

Coming Next:  A Painted Desert and a Crystal Forest