Tips to Protect You and Your Dog in Snake Season

snake-on-a-trailCobraCaroline recently spoke with Laura Cross at about how folks can help keep themselves and their dogs safe during a snake encounter.  Read the fantastic article here:

Creature Feature: False Map Turtle

False Map Turtle

Graptemys pseudogeographica

Reptiles Alive Name: Atlas

Hisssstory: Atlas was an unwanted pet that someone released into a Fairfax VA pond.  A park naturalist was able to capture the turtle and then transferred it to Reptiles Alive.

RA Diet: Atlas eats a diet of crickets, superworms, earthworms, and special zoo turtle pellet food.

Natural Diet: In the wild, false map turtles will eat a variety of aquatic insects, mollusks, and fish.

Range: False map turtles range all along the Mississippi river and its tributaries in the mid-western United States.

Habitat: False map turtles prefer rivers and streams with a current and plenty of vegetation to hide in and fallen logs to bask on.

Size: Male map turtles grow to around 6 inches in length.  Females grow larger, up to 12 inches long.

Lifespan: False map turtles can live 35 years or more.

Reproduction: False map turtle mate twice a year in spring and then again in fall.  Males wiggle their front feet to get the female’s attention.  Clutches of 8-22 eggs are laid in burrows dug by the females in sandy soil.  Like many reptiles, the temperature at which the eggs are incubated determines if the baby turtles will be male or female.

Conservation Issues: Although false map turtles are not currently listed as threatened, their populations are subject to the same threats as other aquatic species including water pollution and habitat destruction,

Cool Facts: False map turtles belong to the same genus Graptemys as all other map turtles, so their is nothing false about calling them a map turtle.  Map turtles are also known sawback turtles because of the pointy protrusions along the back of their shell.  

RA’s Newest Teachers’ Guide: Desert Reptiles Alive!

At Reptiles Alive LLC, our goal is to share our passion and love for creatures of all kinds.  We offer a variety of live reptile shows featuring varying topics ranging from our local environment to tropical rain forests.  Teachers’ Guides have been created for many of our shows.  The newest guide to”Desert Reptiles Alive!” was just added to our website and the link is here:

Desert Reptiles Alive! Teachers’ Guide

Check it out and let us know what you think.

CobraCaroline survived her stay in Death Valley.

CobraCaroline survived her stay in Death Valley.



Celebrating 20 Years of Reptiles Alive LLC Part I – A Look Way Back

With Reptiles Alive LLC celebrating its 20th anniversary this year, I wanted to share some of the amazing moments and memories of how it all started.

A question I get asked quite often is “Why do you like snakes so much?” My love of snakes began when I was very young.  My grand-mom read me the story Rikki Tikki Tavi. When I saw pictures of cobras in the book,  I thought these were the most amazing and wonderful creatures imaginable!  I asked mom for a pet cobra.  She said no.

Although I couldn’t have a pet cobra, both my parents and grandparents were amazing in fully supporting and encouraging my interest in snakes even though none of them had any interest in scaly or legless creatures.   My parents allowed me to collect a small menagerie of local snakes, turtles, and frogs to keep in my bedroom. Grand-mom would “snake-sit”  my pets when I was away on family vacations. During one snake-sitting occasion, my northern brown snake gave birth to 20 teeny-tiny baby brown snakes at grand-mom’s house.  (Baby brown snakes are about two inches long and thinner than an earthworm. Teeny-tiny!)

On a few occasions, some of my pets would escape.  True stories:  Dad found a bull frog in his shoe one morning; Mom found a large spotted salamander creeping across her bedroom floor one night; and my younger brother found a gray tree frog stuck to his bedroom mirror and thought a rock had somehow gotten stuck there.  And of course there was the occasional snake slithering down the hall.  For some reason, most of the escapees headed for my parents’ room.

I spent most of my childhood days in the swamp behind our house searching for snakes and other critters.  When I wasn’t out in the swamp, I read every reptile related book I could find at the local library. Writing in my “herpetology journal” was how I spent colder months when the reptiles in my neighborhood were hibernating.  Yep, I was a herp nerd.  No doubt.

CobraCaroline wearing her favorite snake shirt with Dad and painted turtle. Smoking is BAD, this was the 70's though...

CobraCaroline wearing her favorite iron-on snake shirt with Dad and a painted turtle.

I was lucky enough to live near Hidden Oaks Nature Center, a place that not only could I visit nearly every week to see captive snakes, but also had a kind staff naturalist who encouraged my interest in herpetology and let me begin volunteering at the center when I was only 9 years old. (Thank you Nancy Cooley!) One of the first live reptile shows I performed happened sometime in the 70’s at Hidden Oaks Nature Center.

One of CobraCaroline's very firs live reptile shows!

One of CobraCaroline’s very first live reptile shows!

The hair might have been big, but the plumed basilisk was awesome!

The 80’s hair might have been big, but the plumed basilisk was awesome!

During high school, I continued volunteering at the nature center and also became a licensed wildlife rehabilitator.  As a reptile rehabber, I began rescuing not only injured wild reptiles but also taking in unwanted pet reptiles and sometimes assisting animal control agencies with reptile “situations.”

cv and copperhead

Treating an ailing copperhead

Morletts Crocodile at the Fairfax County Animal Shelter

Morlett’s crocodile at Fairfax County Animal Shelter

While attending Northern Virginia Community College, my vertebrate zoology professor Walter Bulmer reaffirmed my passion for reptiles and natural history.  He led us on many awesome field herping expeditions to places including the Great Dismal Swamp where I learned how to catch amphiumas, bats, and songbirds. (Fun RA fact: Caroline’s zoology teacher Mr. Bulmer is RA wildlife educator Tony Bulmer’s dad!)

At George Mason University, I was finally able to take Dr. Carl Ernst’s graduate course in herpetology.  This was a dream I’d had since I was in 4th grade and my parents purchased his book Turtles of the United States as my birthday present.  I met Dr. Ernst then and asked if I could take his class.  He laughed and said “Maybe in 10 years or so.”  And I did take that class.  One of the best courses ever.

After graduation, a I worked at a variety of interesting jobs:  snake removal technician at a pest control company; wildlife educator at a local zoo; and park ranger and naturalist.

Park Ranger Caroline and Eastern box turtle.

Park Ranger Caroline and Eastern box turtle.

I had been presenting educational live reptile shows part-time since I was 9, but wondered, could I really make this work as a full-time business?  I took the chance and quit all my other jobs to focus on creating my dream:  an organization with a mission dedicated to showing people how awesome and important snakes, reptiles, and other misunderstood animals really are.

In 1996, I founded “The Reptile Lady,” soon to be renamed, “Reptiles Alive LLC.”

Taking calls at the new RA HQ!

The Reptile Lady taking calls in the new office

Next:  Looking Back at the first 20 Years of Reptiles Alive LLC

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  1. Leesburg Flower & Garden Festival Reptiles Alive Show

    April 21 @ 11:00 am - 11:45 am
  2. Mason Neck State Park Eagle Festival

    May 12 @ 11:15 am - 5:00 pm
We had a great experience with Reptiles Alive for my daughter’s 6th birthday party. Rachel arrived exactly on time, set up quickly, and immediately engaged the group of curious children. We had an impromptu dance party while waiting for last minute guests and Rachel was very accommodating. The children LOVED the show!! And my soon-to-be 11 year old wants them to come for his birthday! I highly recommend Reptiles Alive for your next event!read more

Kelly Maguire

Kelly Maguire

22:57 12 Mar 18

We just had Reptiles Alive come to our preschool and the kids loved it!! We had 4 shows over 2 days to accommodate all our children and everything went great! Caroline was very easy to work with and quick to respond to all my emails. She was our presenter too and was early each day and ready to go when the kids arrived. She really geared her show towards our audience (2-5yr olds) and had them laughing and answering her questions and touching the animals. It was perfect… we would definitely book them again!!read more

Lauren Dolinski

Lauren Dolinski

20:47 01 Mar 18

We booked Reptiles Alive for our son’s 7th birthday party. Miss Rachel put on an amazing show for the 20 kids we had over. The highlight was when my son and I had the chance to hold a long and surprisingly heavy boa constrictor named Sunflower. The show was both educational and fun for the kids, and it kept them captivated for a full hour – priceless!!read more

Rick Jandrain

Rick Jandrain

01:53 06 Feb 18

Rachel is an awesome instructor and very good with many kids. The reptiles were fascinating. This was a great birthday party for my daughter and her second grade more

Robert McKeon

Robert McKeon

23:26 26 Feb 18

We invited Reptiles Alive for our birthday party. Ms. Rachel did a wonderful job to educate the kids about the fun facts of Reptiles and also kept them entertained and focused. It’s not a easy job facing a bunch of 7-year-old boys and 3-year-old preschoolers. We highly recommend Reptiles Alive show. It’s fun and full of knowledge!read more

Tianchan Niu

Tianchan Niu

22:09 17 Dec 17